Home Inspection 101 For The Home Buyer

Why is the home inspector the buyer’s best friend? In a real estate transaction, there are many parties involved with different interests. The buyer, the seller, the real estate agent, the mortgage broker, the appraiser, the attorney, the title company, the insurance company and the home inspector. The inspector and the buyer’s attorney are the buyer’s best friend because they help protect the buyer’s interests. A home inspector is hired by the buyer most often to inspect the house he/she is buying to offer a professional and unbiased report on the condition of the house. So what is at stake here for the buyer? The money he is going to pay for the house as well as the future money he is going to pay for the house plus his and his family’s health

How does they buyer choose a home inspector? What are the fees associated with a home inspection? Since a home inspection is so important, a buyer should choose a inspector carefully. A buyer should not choose a inspector just based on the fee he charges. Ask questions about what he is going to inspect and how long his inspections take and how quick his report will be ready. There are home inspectors who charge $100 to $150 flat fee inspections, but whose inspection takes 1/2 hour to 1 hour and those inspections are not as accurate or has the quality as those inspections which require more time and equipment. A good inspection of a house can take 3 to 4 hours at a fee of $500 dollars. This fee is minuscule compared to the price of the house.

When should a buyer get a inspection done? Never use the home inspector your real estate agent refer to you even if the agent represents the buyer. This is obvious because the success of the transaction hinges on the outcome of the inspection. Nor use the home inspection an attorney refers you. To get the most unbiased home inspector, pick one who is not related to the other parties of the transaction. You should get the inspection done before you go into contract.

When should a seller get a inspection done? A seller should get a inspection done before he list his home for sale with a real estate agent.

What does a home inspector inspect? A general home inspection is defined by different home inspection organizations. One of the largest home inspection organizations is NACHI. Membership with one of the home inspection organizations is a good sign the inspector is following some standards of practice when he does his inspections. Click on this link to view the InterNACHI Standards of Practice.

How does a inspection help the home buyer save money? The answer is an inspection will most likely reveal a defect with the house you are buying that would cost some money to fix in the future if you are going to buy the house. You can save some money here by bringing up all the defects the inspection report reveals up to the negotiation process before you sign the contract, make the earnest money deposit, or the deposit.

A Home Inspection is in Your Best Interest When Buying a Home

When you’re in the market for a home, have that dream home inspected by a qualified professional home inspector. Why? Because a home inspector will give you a report on the overall condition of the home. You’ll get an in depth, unbiased perspective you can’t get from a walk through with your real estate agent.

A home inspection evaluates the overall physical condition of the home, including the structure, the overall construction, as well as the mechanical, plumbing and electrical systems. Your inspector’s report will Estimate the remaining useful life of the major systems and equipment. It will also help identify things in need of repair or replacement.

Remember this very important point. An appraisal and a home inspection are two different things. Appraisals are for lenders. They are required to estimate the value of the home and make sure it is marketable. Appraisals are used to make sure the house meets minimum property standards and requirements if it is an FHA loan.

On the other hand, the home inspection is meant for you, the prospective buyer. You’ll get a report that serves as a snapshot of the home’s condition. It’s not designed to be a list of negatives, but rather is intended to give you an objective outlook to help you in your decision making process as you consider whether to buy the home.

The report is not a pass or fail grade card, but gives you facts you need. It also isn’t supposed to favor the home’s seller or buyer. It should tell you the home’s strengths and weaknesses. It should be the home inspector’s goal to report what he finds with objectivity and fairness.

What if the home inspector finds problems with the home? You may be wondering, if you are buying the home with FHA financing, does FHA guarantee the value and condition of the home? In a word, No. Keep this in mind. If you find problems with your new home after closing, FHA can not give or lend you money for repairs. They also can not buy the home back from you. This underscores the importance of getting a thorough and independent home inspection done on the home before you decide to buy.

There’s another critical point to consider. Don’t accept a report from a previous inspection of the home. A fresh home inspection must be done to insure the home’s condition is reported accurately for you.

Though your agent may seem like a hero for saving you money when passing along a report from a previous inspection, he’s really being unethical. Home inspection reports are confidential material for the buyer who ordered the inspection. Furthermore, things change, and the report likely doesn’t reflect the true condition of the home at the time you want to buy it.

Suppose you rely in a previously done inspection when you buy and move into your home. Then what if the roof leaks or the air conditioner doesn’t cool properly? You’re stuck with major repairs due to lack of proper documentation. This wouldn’t have been an issue if you had a new home inspection done. Perhaps systems worked fine during the previous inspection. If so, the inspector can’t be held at fault. Furthermore, the problem is compounded because you weren’t the one who hired the inspector to begin with.

Seeking relief from your real estate agent is awkward because he supposedly did you a favor. Yet he provided the report improperly. If the previous prospective buyer hears of this, she’ll be upset and feel betrayed by the agent because she paid for the inspection, and the agent broke confidentiality. This is bad for business when such relationships depend on trust.

Until you receive an inspector’s report from a fresh inspection, the information you need for making your buying decision is incomplete and perhaps inaccurate. By hiring a home inspector to do a new home inspection, you’re actually looking out for your own best interest.

Home Inspection Tips With Free Home Inspection Checklist – Efficient Preparation

When it comes time to sell or appraise your home, you’re going to need a home inspection to make sure that your home is in good condition. When conducting a preliminary inspection of your home, it could really help you to have solid home inspection tips and a free home inspection checklist. Having those tips can show you what to look for and where to look for it, while the checklist will help to ensure that you don’t forget any items or locations. With these tools at hand, you’ll find that you can move through your inspections quickly and efficiently.

Most home inspection tips with free home inspection checklist will break your house up into sections so that you can take the inspection a section at a time, making your inspection more efficient. You can start inspecting by room, from the entry to your home all the way out to the backyard. You certainly don’t want to forget to inspect the outside of your home. Curb appeal is becoming more and more important to potential homebuyers, especially in Boca Raton Woodfield Country Club, making it crucial that you pay attention to the exterior details of your home. You can work your way from front to back, and left to right, depending on the easiest flow of movement through your house.

Within each room, there are a variety of categories you want to check. You want to check the structural elements of the house, any plumbing, the electrical features, and any appliances or system equipment (such as a water heater or HVAC unit). You also want to be sure to check out-of-the-way areas, such as the garage, attic, basement, roof, and the exterior of your home. This is a lot of material to have to cover in each room, so it’s always good to have your home inspection tips with free home inspection checklist handy.

Having an inspection can help you get your house ready to put on the market. You’ll be able to see what you need to fix so that you don’t have to pay an appraiser to come out and provide a list of items to repair and then pay him or her to come out and give you a thumbs-up after you’re done with the work. It’s far more efficient to find these issues on your own. And with some good home inspection tips and a free home inspection checklist, you’ll save a lot of time and money on getting your home in the best possible condition.

5 Common Home Inspection Myths

Myth 1: There is no real difference among home inspectors

The Truth: Experience, knowledge and thoroughness vary from inspector to inspector. A person is not qualified as a home inspector just because he or she claims the title-or even if they’re certified; in fact, some states don’t even require that an inspector have a license. Therefore, it is important to do your homework when evaluating home inspectors. Be sure to visit their website and also give them a call to talk. Ask about what services they provide and how much experience they have in the industry. Check their website for a sample report so that you can know what kind of report to expect. Not all home inspectors are created equal and it is up to the client to do their research and find a good one.

Myth 2: A home inspector is only looking out for the seller or Realtor

The Truth: A home inspector’s primary responsibility is to look out for their client. An inspector’s job is to inform the client of the condition of the home with facts. Some people may be uncomfortable with using a home inspector that has been recommended by their Realtor, especially if they do not know their Realtor very well. This is understandable and why everyone should do their own research to find the best home inspector possible for their inspection. It may turn out that the inspector recommended by the Realtor is the best option, or they may find one they feel more comfortable with. Ultimately the choice comes down to the client and it is up to them to make the right choice.

Myth 3: My home is brand new and doesn’t need a home inspection

The Truth: Home builders have to meet the minimum requirements of the building code in existence at the time the home is built, but those are minimum requirements and may not reflect the manufacturer’s recommendations. There are also many times home builders take short cuts to save money or speed up a project. Having an inspection completed by a home inspector before closing can help uncover issues that may exist, and provide a homeowner with peace of mind. It is also recommended that an inspection is completed by a third party inspector throughout the construction process, such as before the drywall goes up. This provides an opportunity for the inspector to inspect things that they would normally not be able to inspect once the drywall is up. Furthermore, like everyone else, home builder make mistakes, and some of these can be very costly for the home owner in the long run.

Myth 4: Having my home inspected means that I will not have any repair needs or maintenance expenses right away

The Truth: The purpose of a home inspection is not to report on every minor imperfection in the home or guarantee that no repairs will be needed. As a visual assessment of the condition of the major components of the home, it is beyond the scope of the home inspector to foresee every potential malfunction. However, major defects will be found and the home buyer will be informed of these findings. A home inspection saves the home buyer from buying a home with major defects that can affect the value and even the safety of the home.

Myth 5: Every inch of a home is inspected

The Truth: The inspection is a limited visual inspection of major components. It is not a forensic inspection, so home inspectors will not dismantle the systems in order to inspect their inner workings. At times they will remove covers and access panels, but obviously, they cannot see within walls or beneath concrete slabs. There are literally thousands of components and materials used in constructing a home, so they focus on the most essential and highest risk areas.

By learning the truth regarding these and other home inspection myths, potential home inspection clients are in a better position to understand the process and get more out of it. Furthermore, the home inspector’s job is made easier when the client has a good idea of what to expect from the inspection.